Annual Memorial Day Commemoration May 28th

Annual Memorial Day Commemoration May 28, 11am, Maysey Memorial, Main St. Chester Borough, NJ

Chester will remember those in the Armed Forces who died while serving their country on “Decoration Day,” or as it is better known today, “Memorial Day.” People from the community will gather on Main Street in Chester Borough to watch the procession, listen to inspiring stories, hear moving speeches and patriotic musical arrays. Participants will also experience the rattling rifle salute and moving taps, as we honor those who gave all for our country, on this very important day. The event will take place on Monday, May 28th, 2018 at 11am at Maysey Memorial/Memorial Park in the center of town and will feature Mayor Janet Hoven as the Master of Ceremonies, with remarks from members of the American Legion Post 342 Chester, and Mayor Marcia Asdal from Chester Township. The West Morris Community Band under the direction of Gary Quam will provide music for the event along with vocal soloist & Chester resident, Mary Bolio. Our own Chester Volunteer Fire Company #1, Chester Police, and Chester Volunteer First Aid Squad will be present to honor our veterans, along with local scout troops sporting color guard and full uniform attire. Members of the American Legion will perform the ceremonious Laying of the Wreaths and Roll Call of Chester Fallen Soldiers. The event is sponsored by the Borough of Chester in conjunction with American Legion Post 342, Chester. Anyone who served or is currently serving in the Armed Forces is invited to walk in the procession to pay their thanks and should gather at the Gazebo on Main Street at 10:45am. For more details about the event please contact Recreation Director at: recreation@chesterborough.org

Residents asked to help with mosquito control

Thursday, May 17th, 2018

Remove Standing Water from Your Property

Morris County Residents Asked to Join the Battle Against MosquitoesA very wet spring is creating an environment in many parts of Morris County that is quite conducive to the breeding of mosquitoes, which already are causing a major nuisance for residents living in areas of Lincoln Park and Montville, among other locations.

In recent days, when weather has allowed, county mosquito control teams have been tackling heavy mosquito breeding areas via trucks, ATVs and back-mounted sprayers. They have sprayed this week in Florham Park, Montville, Lincoln Park and East Hanover, and have plans for continued spraying at many other locations.

Visit the county’s mosquito control webpage https://morriscountynj.gov/mosquito/for the upcoming spraying schedule.

Residents in all 39 Morris County towns also are being asked to help out in this battle. Between what seem-to-be constant rain showers, county mosquito control officials are asking you to thoroughly check the outside of your house, apartment, condominium, or wherever you live in Morris County and drain sources of standing water to eliminate areas where mosquitoes can breed.

Morris County Residents Asked to Join the Battle Against Mosquitoes

Empty water from planters

Try to eliminate all sources of standing water, such as planters, gutters, old tires, wheelbarrows, clogged gutters and other sources of standing water that can breed mosquitoes.

“If everyone would take steps around their own homes to eliminate standing water, it could make a very big difference, reducing the number of mosquitoes by many hundreds of thousands, if not millions, where you live,’’ said Mosquito Division Superintendent Kristian McMorland.

The Morris County Division of Mosquito Control has been active for months preparing for this year’s mosquito battle, but you can be the difference maker when it comes to mosquitoes around where you live.

“It’s important to remove or clean or repair anything that can collect rain or sprinkler water – such as clogged gutters, old car tires, wheelbarrows, planters, trash can covers, birdbaths, old tarps, or unused swimming or wading pools,’’ said McMorland. “Even just a bit of standing water can produce a huge number of mosquitoes that can have a negative impact on your quality of life.’’

The water in a wheelbarrow can produce enough mosquitoes to infest your entire neighborhood.

The most common backyard species of mosquito travels only about thousand feet from where they are spawned. Mosquitoes spend their juvenile life stage in the aquatic environment and will go from egg to adult in about one week during the summer. So removing standing water near your home can have a dramatic impact on your mosquito population.

In addition to the nuisance of mosquitoes, they also bring the possibility of mosquito borne diseases, such as West Nile virus, which is transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito.

“Our county team does a great job of working to battle mosquitoes in some of the toughest breeding grounds in the county but they need your help when it comes to making a difference in your yard or neighborhood,’’ said Freeholder John Cesaro, liaison to the County Mosquito Control Division. “What steps you take, or don’t take, can affect families living all around you.’’

Mosquitoes require standing water for 7 days to complete their development.

Steps you can take to reduce mosquito populations include:

  • Morris County Residents Asked to Join the Battle Against MosquitoesAt least once a week, empty water from flowerpots, pet food and water dishes, birdbaths, swimming pool covers, buckets, barrels, and cans.
  • Check for clogged rain gutters and clean them out.
  • Recycle discarded tires, and remove other items that could collect water.
  • Be sure to check for containers or trash in places that may be hard to see, such as under bushes or under your home.

Look very carefully around your property for anything that could hold water in which mosquitoes can lay eggs. If your home is under construction, make sure standing water is not collecting on tarps or in any receptacles.

Additional tips on how to limit mosquitoes on your property include:

  • Drill holes in the bottom and elevate recycling containers that are left outdoors;
  • Aerate ornamental pools or stock them with fish. Water gardens are fashionable but become major mosquito producers if they are allowed to stagnate;
  • Clean and chlorinate swimming pools, including those that are not being used. An untended swimming pool can produce enough mosquitoes to result in neighborhood-wide complaints;
  • Be aware mosquitoes may even breed in the water that collects on pool covers;
  • Dispose of tin cans, plastic containers, ceramic pots or similar water-holding containers that have accumulated on your property.

It is also a good time now to check screens in windows and doors and make any necessary repairs to prevent mosquitoes from entering your home.

For more details on mosquitoes, visit: https://morriscountynj.gov/mosquito/info/

Also, check out the following videos for advice on dealing with mosquitoes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_ekfQ-F4F4 or https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiQXLZnU7lA

 

Chester First Aid Squad seeks volunteers

From the Chester First Aid Squad: “Want to make a significant impact on our community? Join our team of volunteers at the Chester First Aid Squad! Whether as a driver, EMT or EMR, volunteering with us is one of the most rewarding things you can do for the community. Email us at info@chesterfirstaid.org to learn more about becoming a member.”

Chester Borough Names Property at 50 North Road

The Chester Borough Council Has unanimously voted to name the Open Space property at 50 North Road, the Seward Hill Preserve. The Preserve, purchased by the Borough in 2009 from Alcatel-Lucent, consists of 64 acres, which are restricted to passive recreation. There are an additional 22 acres on the parcel which are owned by the municipality and the buildings house the municipal offices and department of public works in addition to the Chester Board of Education.

The prominent feature of the property is Seward Hill.  The Seward Family dates back to the 1700s in Chester.  According to Chester, New Jersey A Scrapbook of History by Frances Greenidge (1974), Obiadiah Seward was a “Black River Patriot” in the Revolutionary War. The Seward Farm was passed down in the Seward family until it was sold to the pastor of the Chester Congregational Church, sometime around 1801.  A portion of an old “Seward” house can still be seen on Seward Place in Chester Borough.  The original Seward Farm was known as the “Welcome Home Farm.”

In 1928, Bell Telephone Laboratories purchased what by then was referred to as Seward’s Hill, as an outdoor testing site.  According to Mrs. Greenidge, the spot was chosen “for its altitude of over a thousand feet, and for its ‘particularly good wind exposure on open wires.’’’ In 1929, the original “telephone pole forest” was installed.

At some point, John and Willard Apgar, decedents of early settlers of Chester, decided to erect a Christmas Star on the Hill, which remains a tradition to this day.  Mrs. Greenidge also mentioned that the Bell Lab employees enjoyed working on the property and one of them brought in a high powered telescope and placed it on the Hill.  It is said that on a clear day, the men could count 33 stories of the Empire State Building.

Today, the Seward Hill Preserve is home to a trails system which winds its way through Chester Township and Borough.  Native plantings dot the landscape and wildlife freely roam its environs.

Prescription Drug Disposal Event Sat. April 28

On April 28th from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the Chester Police Department and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will give the public its 15th opportunity in seven years to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs. Bring your pills for disposal to Chester Police Department at 1 Parker Road, Chester, NJ 07930. The DEA cannot accept liquids or needles or sharps, only pills or patches. If you can not make the event we have a MedReturn Collection box in the police headquarters lobby that can be utilized by Chester residents.

Tennis postponed a week

Chester Borough Recreation announces that this week’s tennis program is going to be postponed a week due to court conditions. Any questions should be directed to the Recreation Director at recreation@chesterborough.org

JCP&L Helicopter Inspections

From JCP&L: “Please be advised that on approximately April 14th weather permitting, Chesapeake Bay Helicopters will be performing a comprehensive visual inspection (CVI) patrol on the T5020 (Smithburg-Deans) 500kV line and will be performing Routine Patrols on all 230kV and 115kV transmission lines. CBH will be patrolling JCP&L territory full-time until the inspections are completed – inspections will take approximately two weeks for completion.
A Comprehensive Visual Inspection (CVI) is a slow, structure by structure, span by span inspection in which the crew is getting a detailed look at the structure, conductor, and all associated hardware. The helicopter will be seen moving very slowly along the lines and at times may be seen hovering during the inspection getting a closer look at the transmission line, structure(s), and hardware.
A routine patrol/inspection is a general, overall look at the transmission line and associated hardware. The helicopter will be traveling at speeds of 25-30mph and may at times hover over top of structures and/or spans of conductor to get a better look at any problems/issues found during patrols.
It should be noted that the contractor has been authorized to patrol the transmission circuits in their entirety (i.e. “breaker-to-breaker”), so patrols on certain lines may therefore extend into the neighboring regions. The flight crew provides information on their daily location to both Transmission Lines Maintenance and the FCC, and the pilot will be in communication with any local airports when in their airspace. Please advise local Safety Forces and other public entities or sensitive customers as needed.”

Well Water Testing Available to Chester Area Residents

This spring, Chester Township and Chester Borough will team up with Raritan Headwaters to offer well testing at an affordable cost. Residents can purchase water sample collection kits on Saturday, April 7th from 9:00 a.m. to noon at The Barn at Highlands Ridge Park at 100 North Road. Water samples must then be dropped off on Monday, April 9th from 6:30-10:00 a.m. at The Barn. Test results will be available two weeks later.

Unlike public drinking water systems, private wells are not required by law to be regularly checked for contamination before the water is sent to the tap.

Raritan Headwaters is a nonprofit watershed conservation organization working to protect and preserve the public’s access to safe, clean water that is swimmable, fishable and most importantly, drinkable. Eighty percent of the residents of this region – about 320,000 people – obtain their drinking water through wells.

Well water pollutants found in the region include coliform bacteria, nitrate, arsenic, iron, radon and volatile organic compounds. Sources of contamination include failing septic systems, chemical fertilizers, herbicides, pesticides and naturally-occurring contaminants like arsenic. Water may also become contaminated with lead and copper as it travels through older pipes in the home.

Raritan Headwaters offers a “basic kit” for coliform bacteria and nitrate for $60. Residents may also test for other potential contaminants at an additional cost.

Staff members at RHA are available to advise citizens who are uncertain about which tests to order and to review individual results after testing is complete. More information on the tests we offer can be found at www.testmywell.org. Testing is performed by a private state certified laboratory and results are confidential.

The Community Well Testing program was established in 1974, allowing RHA to monitor the health of our region’s groundwater supply for over four decades. Raritan Headwaters recently completed a 30-year trend analysis of well water tests result in the region, which showed an increase in arsenic levels in several towns as well as slight increases in coliform bacteria and nitrate concentrations.

“Your private well is an important investment that is best protected by regular check-ups to ensure a reliable and safe source of drinking water for you and your family,” said Mara Tippett, well test manager for RHA.

Residents who aren’t able to take advantage of the Chester’s Community Well Test event can contact Tippett to arrange to pick up a test kit at RHA’s Bedminster or Flemington office. She can be contacted at 908-234-1852, ext. 401 or welltesting@raritanheadwaters.org.

For more information about Raritan Headwaters and its programs and preserves, go to www.raritanheadwaters.org.

Free Dogwood Trees available 4/14

The Chester Township Environmental and Open Space Commission and The Chester Borough Shade Tree Commission are giving away Free Dogwood Trees!

Pick up a lovely flowering dogwood seedling on April 14, 2018 from 9:30 am until Noon at the Gazebo on Main Street.

Honor Earth Day and Arbor Day by Planting a Tree

Also, there will be information on Emerald Ash Borer, an insect attacking our Ash trees!

Don’t know if you have Ash trees?  Come and see our display to help you identify Ash trees.